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2012-02-29

When I was younger and naÔve in the church, I asked a pastor why God wanted animal sacrifices. He told me that God doesnít want animal sacrifices, God only allowed people to slaughter animals because they thought they could use their blood as forgiveness for the sins of Adam and Eve. Pause for effect.

So letís be clear. In Exodus 23:14-19, God is commanding the Israelites to do so. God is not asking or merely allowing the Israelites to slaughter animals in his honor, he is demanding that they do so with great regularity. Every four months every Israelite family is expected to have a feast in Godís honor with the smell of thousands of gallons of blood fresh in the air.

Now letís address the why behind these sacrifices. The most popular response is that the animals are bearing the brunt of Godís wrath on us because of what Adam did. This is mad barbarism. Killing an animal to shield yourself from someone who wants to kill you because of something one your ancestors did is an affront to any civilized moral code. And do you want to know the real sad thing behind this? According to Christians, the billions of animals that have been sacrificed over the centuries have been completely in vain. To them, the whole reason God sent Jesus to be sacrificed is because the animal sacrifices werenít enough. God just wasnít able to forgive us for what Adam did until a human was slaughtered.

These feasts are similar to Godís detailing of Passover, which makes sense because one of the feasts is Passover. The other two are Shavuot, and Sukkot, which is a bit odd, because Shavuot celebrates the Torah, which hasnít been written yet, and Sukkot celebrates the 40-year wandering in the wilderness which hasnít happened yet. I guess when youíre a deity you bother getting hung up on temporal mechanics and just use your TARDIS to create holidays.

By the way, today is a leap day!

 

Comments

someguy writes:

 

what happens to the animals after they are sacrificed?

are they burned (no use to anyone)

are they eaten (in other words what people pretty much did anyway during feast times)

or given to the church (give us your best meat scam)

or is the meat given to he poor (i can guess not this one, because it sounds nice, and well, its the bible)

Baughbe writes:

 

Happy Sadie Hawkins Day!

Now back to the topic at hand. If you are required to slaughter your best animals and destroy your best crops every 4 months, what is the long term effect? You lose all your good breeding stock, all your good seed stock and become poorer and poorer unless you are wealthly enought to take the loss without being pauperized by it. Eventually only the wealthy will have any viable stock. This is essentially economic sabotage to ensure that the masses are fully dependant on the wealthy minority. It's brilliant. Evil, but brilliant.

Richard writes:

 

Not to mention how terrible this is for the breeding of animals. If you keep killing off your best animals, you are eventually going to end up with shit animals. But, of course, when the poor have weeds to eat ever seven years, I guess it is OK if you don't have good animals.

Ladyofthemasque writes:

 

Someguy, I vaguely remember something about how with the animals sacrificed, the priesthood was allowed to take bits of the burning (aka cooked) meat for themselves, and the rest was supposed to be charred to cinders. I could be wrong, but...either way you look at it, burning flesh smell, "yum"...

Ladyofthemasque writes:

 

Btw, TAG, I love the perspective on the camel. Not the fact that the poor thing has been slaughtered, but the artwork depicting its position is well-done.

TheAlmightyGuru writes:

 

@Ladyofthemasque: Camel? Uh yeah, it's a camel. Thanks for the compliment! ;-)

Ladyofthemasque writes:

 

Er...horse...hoved...donkey-like...deer-thing?

>.>*


XD Honestly, I dunno why I typed camel.

 

Oh the irony!