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Skepticism







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Updated every weekday.         Please vote!    

 

2014-01-17

Once the spies return to Kadesh in the desert of Paran, and might I just say, there are a lot of places in the Middle East called Kadesh, they speak to the congregation of Israelites. They explain that the land of Canaan is indeed a fertile land flowing with milk and honey! Well isnít that funny? Long ago, Canaan was a rich land, and then Abraham moved there and suddenly there was a famine. Abraham left, and in his absence, Canaan rebounded and became prosperous again. But when Abraham returned, the land fell back into desolation, causing him to leave again. Then, Abrahamís son Isaac was in Canaan, and there was another famine, so he left. Abrahamís grandson Jacob started to live in Canaan, and sure enough, a famine strikes again! Now, Moses, Abrahamís great-great-great grandson finds that Canaan is beautiful and wants to move there. Are you starting to see a pattern here?

Itís almost as if Abrahamís family is causing the famines with their presence. A superstitious explanation would be that God is cursing Canaan every time and Abrahamic person sets foot in the land. A more reasonable explanation would be that the Abrahamic people are destroying the land each time they return, possibly by consuming all the vegetation or accidentally poisoning it in some way. A historically accurate explanation would be that these people never existed, and this story never occurred.

Be that as it may, we must continue with the story. After the Israelites are thrilled to see that the spies stole some fruits, the other shoe drops. The land is occupied by several well-fortified tribes. The evil Amalekites who once attacked the Iaraelites for no reason dwell in the south, the Hittites, Jebusites, and Amorites live in the hills, and the Canaanites dwell near the sea (probably the Dead Sea) and along the Jordan River. But worst of all, are the children of Anak, Ahiman, Sheshai, and Talmai! DUN DUN DUN!

You can bet that fanfare would be met with a bit more drama if Anak wasnít a total stranger, but the bibleís authors arenít very good at introducing villains.

 

Comments

JL writes:

 

I like the third explanation best. ^^

JL

Maju writes:

 

"Are you starting to see a pattern here?"

Seems so.

"A more reasonable explanation would be that the Abrahamic people are destroying the land each time they return, possibly by consuming all the vegetation or accidentally poisoning it in some way".

Seems so.

"A historically accurate explanation would be that these people never existed, and this story never occurred".

Myths usually have a kernel of truth in them.

 

Oh the irony!